We Don’t Have to Suspend So Many Kids—But Alternatives Cost $$$$

Alternatives to *no excuses* discipline exist, but they don’t come cheap….

Corey 2 By Corey Gaber
The typical *woke* person’s evaluation of the behavior management landscape is that we suspend and expel too many kids. We suspend more than 3 million students a year, twice the level of suspensions in the 1970s. And we suspend kids for less and less severe actions, most famously in no-excuses charter chains, for doing things like singing Michael Jackson’s Man in the Mirror in the Cafeteria. As has been well documented, we teachers and administrators issue consequences in a racially-biased manner. 

But removing a student from school rarely benefits the student. In fact it often hurts their long term academic prospects. They miss valuable class time and teacher support, which puts them in a tough position to catch up whenever they do return. They often harbor feelings of resentment, embarrassment, and/or confusion about the suspension, combined with their academic falling behind can lead to further acting out. Finally, suspension is unlikely to address the root problem that led to the behavior in the first place. Continue reading →

Open Doors, Open Hearts

The exponential rewards of being unafraid…

mrvrulerWhen I walked through the door of José Vilson’s New York City classroom recently, I was in search of something very particular: hope. You see, after a week in New York touring what so often turned out to be the wreckage of the city’s now decades-long experiment in education reform, not to mention catching a disturbing look at what is likely the future of education there, I was in serious need of a pick-me-up. So I boarded the A train and took it all the way up to Dyckman and Broadway, the penultimate stop. I showed up in José’s eighth grade classroom—excuse me, make that Mr. Vilson’s classroom—in time for a lesson on exponents. But what I took away, aside from a new understanding of a topic that eluded me in 8th grade, was something exponentially bigger.  Continue reading →

This Is Not a Test

The interview with the José Vilson

this-is-not-a-test-cover-3bEduShyster: Your new book, This is Not a Test, has as its subtitle *a new narrative on race, class and education.* I inhaled the book over the course of a weekend, but I couldn’t figure out what the new narrative was. And then it finally dawned on me that you, José Luis Vilson, are the new narrative.

José Vilson: That would be it. There’s a lack of nuance in all facets of what we talk about when we talk about education. So I took a different approach. I tried to address education through narrative and stories, which I think is way more powerful than just coming out and saying *I don’t like this crap.* Continue reading →