Is it Time to Cancel Teach Like a Champion?

Teach Like a Champion, the best-selling guide to effective teaching by Doug Lemov, has sold millions of copies. But a growing group of critics charge that Lemov’s approach is racist and embodies “carceral” pedagogy. And because we have a thing about education history, we go all the way back to 1895 to explore another controversial teacher training model: The Hampton Institute, founded at the end of the Civil War with the express purpose of maintaining racial hierarchy. Special guests: Ilana Horn, Joe Truss and Layla Treuhaft-Ali.  Complete transcript available here. The financial support of listeners like you keeps this podcast going. Subscribe on Patreon or donate on PayPal.

Arrested Development: How Police Ended Up in Schools

Have You Heard had a question: how did cops end up in US public schools in the first place? To find the answer, we head to Boston, Los Angeles and Chicago. With the aid of a trio of experts—historians Matt Kautz, Judith Kafka, and Louis Mercer—we learn about what prompted the entry of police into each city’s schools. And some common themes emerge, including the criminalization of student demands for racial justice and equity, and an increasing antagonism between white teachers and Black and Brown students in 1960’s America.  Complete transcript available here. The financial support of listeners like you keeps this podcast going. Subscribe on Patreon or donate on PayPal.

Mail Order Schools: the Past and Present of Distance Learning

Students flailing without real teachers. Sky-high dropout rates. Aggressive sales pitches. Sound familiar? Have You Heard revisits America’s first great love affair with distance learning, the learn-by-mail craze that swept the nation 100+ years ago. The case for distance learning made by the original (for profit) edu-preneurs was virtually identical to what we’re hearing today. But while they sold the promise of “personalized learning” free from the distraction of classmates, distance learning 1.0 suffered from the same problem that plagues its 21st century counterpart: learning alone has never worked for the vast majority of students. Special guests: education historian Bob Hampel and “Young Jack,” a student at an early 20th century correspondence school. Complete transcript available here.

The financial support of listeners like you keeps this podcast going. Subscribe on Patreon or donate on PayPal.

States of Shock: the Coming Budget Calamity

A looming budget calamity worse than the Great Recession could mean mass teacher layoffs and deep cuts to school spending. In our latest episode Have You Heard previews the bleak budget forecast, how to avert it, and why the GOP seems to want states to go broke. Experts Bruce Baker, Sarah Reckhow and Jesse Rothstein weigh in, and, in a sign of what’s to come, we meet a teacher whose alternative school is going online and for-profit next year. Full transcript of the episode is here. And if you enjoy Have You Heard, please consider supporting us on Patreon.

The Right to Read

In the latest episode of Have You Heard we dig into the recent – and surprising – decision by a federal court declaring that there is in fact a constitutional right to education. One catch: the court defined that right very narrowly as a “basic minimum education.” Jennifer and Jack explore what the ruling does, and doesn’t mean, with the help of an all star cast, including Noliwe Rooks, author of Cutting School; Michael Rebell, executive director of the Center for Educational Equity; and former Detroit teacher Stephanie Griffin.

Full transcript of the episode is here. And if you enjoy Have You Heard, please consider supporting us on Patreon.