The Next Generation of Math Whizzes is in Our Urban Schools

Meet BEAM: an experimental program for middle-school math whizzes—low income gifted students who get overlooked…

By Emil Friedman
Lynn Cartwright-Punnett looks at advanced, extracurricular math in the same way that David Brooks looks at Italian deli meats: cultural capital standing between lower-income folks and entrance to America’s elite – but for her, it’s the world of hyper-charged mathematicians and computer scientists, not soppressata and the New Yorker, she’s working to equalize access to.

Ms. Cartwright-Punnett is the Director of Programs and Development for Bridge to Enter Advanced Mathematics (known simply as “BEAM”), a three-week summer math camp held at private colleges in upstate New York, tuition-free, for lower-income public middle schoolers from the city. BEAM serves hundreds of students per summer, offering them a choice of elective college-level math classes (combinatorics, anyone?) alongside high school standardized test prep.

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Education Can’t Fix Poverty (So why do we keep insisting that it can?)

Have You Heard talks to historian Harvey Kantor, the author of this excellent history, about how education came to be seen as THE fix for poverty. Hint: it all starts in the 1960’s with the advent of the Great Society programs. Fast forward to the present and our belief that education can reduce poverty and narrow the nation’s yawning inequality chasm is stronger than ever. And yet education, argues Kantor, is actually exacerbating income inequality. In episode #24, Have You Heard welcomes back co-host Jack Schneider—well, sort of! 

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The Mismeasure of Schools: Data, Real Estate and Segregation

Have You Heard Episode #23: The Mismeasure of Schools: Data, Real Estate and Segregation

In this episode, Jennifer Berkshire and Jack Schneider discuss how test scores and other current metrics distort our picture of school quality, often fostering segregation in the process. What would a better set of measures include? Our intrepid hosts venture inside an urban elementary school to find out. You can read the entire transcript here, and be sure to check out Jack’s new book, which is really the star of the latest episode.

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The Right’s Long Crusade Against “Government Schools”

Have You Heard Episode #22: The Right’s Long Crusade Against “Government Schools”: a Conversation with Historian Nancy MacLean

Nancy MacLean’s Democracy in Chains: the Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America, is one of the most buzzed about books of the summer. But her book is also about public education, and the Right’s long crusade to privatize what they call “government schools.” You can read a transcript of the entire interview here. MacLean’s book is fantastic, and I hope that this interview encourages you to read it. Just don’t blame me if you need to sleep with the lights on! Note: if you’re wondering what happened to Have You Heard’s other half, Jack Schneider, he’s been traveling and will be reappearing in episode #23.

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‘I Quit!’

Have You Heard Episode #21: Teachers Are Leaving and They Want to Tell You Why 

In this episode of Have You Heard, we hear from teachers who left their jobs – and wanted to tell the world why. Some left *kicking and screaming,* as was the case with Oklahoma Teacher of the Year Shawn Sheehan. Others shared powerful emotional appeals with the world to object to everything they feel is wrong with public education. These very public resignations are a form of activism, a way for teachers to articulate how and why teaching needs to change. Warning: this episode should be rated *p* for powerful! You can read the transcript of the episode here.

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